arabious

Revving up for a big return.
Lahbieb Embarek Ahmed, 47, camel worker, in the desert near the Saharawi refugee camps, Algeria. ‘I have lived with camels and they have lived with me and that’s all I know. The peace process is a good thing. My land is very beautiful but I am like the others; what will happen to them will happen to me. I am with the majority, if they chose war I am with them.’
Azmah Laulad, 18, in Auserd refugee camp, Algeria, with the lights of Tindouf in the background. ‘I’ve grown up in Auserd but I don’t like it. I’m making bricks and soon me and my brother will build a shop. We will sell mobile phones because there are not enough phone shops here. It’s a tragedy here, people need to go back [to Western Sahara].’
Ali Salem Salma, 41, statistician for the Saharawi government, watching TV at home with his wife, Nabba, and four year old son, Khadda, in Smara refugee camp, Algeria. ‘In 1975 Morocco invaded our cities and the soldiers told us to leave our house. We spent six months traveling to Algeria to the refugee camps and we are still here.’
Chrifa Mohammed Salem, 6, pictured outside her home in Auserd refugee camp, Algeria. ‘I go to school and then I come back and play with my sister. It is very hot, I want it to be cold. I want to be a teacher when I grow up. There is no water here.’
From Jadaliyya’s electronic roundtable on the Western Sahara. Photos by Andrew McConnell.
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Lahbieb Embarek Ahmed, 47, camel worker, in the desert near the Saharawi refugee camps, Algeria. ‘I have lived with camels and they have lived with me and that’s all I know. The peace process is a good thing. My land is very beautiful but I am like the others; what will happen to them will happen to me. I am with the majority, if they chose war I am with them.’
Azmah Laulad, 18, in Auserd refugee camp, Algeria, with the lights of Tindouf in the background. ‘I’ve grown up in Auserd but I don’t like it. I’m making bricks and soon me and my brother will build a shop. We will sell mobile phones because there are not enough phone shops here. It’s a tragedy here, people need to go back [to Western Sahara].’
Ali Salem Salma, 41, statistician for the Saharawi government, watching TV at home with his wife, Nabba, and four year old son, Khadda, in Smara refugee camp, Algeria. ‘In 1975 Morocco invaded our cities and the soldiers told us to leave our house. We spent six months traveling to Algeria to the refugee camps and we are still here.’
Chrifa Mohammed Salem, 6, pictured outside her home in Auserd refugee camp, Algeria. ‘I go to school and then I come back and play with my sister. It is very hot, I want it to be cold. I want to be a teacher when I grow up. There is no water here.’
From Jadaliyya’s electronic roundtable on the Western Sahara. Photos by Andrew McConnell.
Zoom
Info
Lahbieb Embarek Ahmed, 47, camel worker, in the desert near the Saharawi refugee camps, Algeria. ‘I have lived with camels and they have lived with me and that’s all I know. The peace process is a good thing. My land is very beautiful but I am like the others; what will happen to them will happen to me. I am with the majority, if they chose war I am with them.’
Azmah Laulad, 18, in Auserd refugee camp, Algeria, with the lights of Tindouf in the background. ‘I’ve grown up in Auserd but I don’t like it. I’m making bricks and soon me and my brother will build a shop. We will sell mobile phones because there are not enough phone shops here. It’s a tragedy here, people need to go back [to Western Sahara].’
Ali Salem Salma, 41, statistician for the Saharawi government, watching TV at home with his wife, Nabba, and four year old son, Khadda, in Smara refugee camp, Algeria. ‘In 1975 Morocco invaded our cities and the soldiers told us to leave our house. We spent six months traveling to Algeria to the refugee camps and we are still here.’
Chrifa Mohammed Salem, 6, pictured outside her home in Auserd refugee camp, Algeria. ‘I go to school and then I come back and play with my sister. It is very hot, I want it to be cold. I want to be a teacher when I grow up. There is no water here.’
From Jadaliyya’s electronic roundtable on the Western Sahara. Photos by Andrew McConnell.
Zoom
Info
Lahbieb Embarek Ahmed, 47, camel worker, in the desert near the Saharawi refugee camps, Algeria. ‘I have lived with camels and they have lived with me and that’s all I know. The peace process is a good thing. My land is very beautiful but I am like the others; what will happen to them will happen to me. I am with the majority, if they chose war I am with them.’
Azmah Laulad, 18, in Auserd refugee camp, Algeria, with the lights of Tindouf in the background. ‘I’ve grown up in Auserd but I don’t like it. I’m making bricks and soon me and my brother will build a shop. We will sell mobile phones because there are not enough phone shops here. It’s a tragedy here, people need to go back [to Western Sahara].’
Ali Salem Salma, 41, statistician for the Saharawi government, watching TV at home with his wife, Nabba, and four year old son, Khadda, in Smara refugee camp, Algeria. ‘In 1975 Morocco invaded our cities and the soldiers told us to leave our house. We spent six months traveling to Algeria to the refugee camps and we are still here.’
Chrifa Mohammed Salem, 6, pictured outside her home in Auserd refugee camp, Algeria. ‘I go to school and then I come back and play with my sister. It is very hot, I want it to be cold. I want to be a teacher when I grow up. There is no water here.’
From Jadaliyya’s electronic roundtable on the Western Sahara. Photos by Andrew McConnell.
Zoom
Info
  1. Lahbieb Embarek Ahmed, 47, camel worker, in the desert near the Saharawi refugee camps, Algeria. ‘I have lived with camels and they have lived with me and that’s all I know. The peace process is a good thing. My land is very beautiful but I am like the others; what will happen to them will happen to me. I am with the majority, if they chose war I am with them.’
  2. Azmah Laulad, 18, in Auserd refugee camp, Algeria, with the lights of Tindouf in the background. ‘I’ve grown up in Auserd but I don’t like it. I’m making bricks and soon me and my brother will build a shop. We will sell mobile phones because there are not enough phone shops here. It’s a tragedy here, people need to go back [to Western Sahara].’
  3. Ali Salem Salma, 41, statistician for the Saharawi government, watching TV at home with his wife, Nabba, and four year old son, Khadda, in Smara refugee camp, Algeria. ‘In 1975 Morocco invaded our cities and the soldiers told us to leave our house. We spent six months traveling to Algeria to the refugee camps and we are still here.’
  4. Chrifa Mohammed Salem, 6, pictured outside her home in Auserd refugee camp, Algeria. ‘I go to school and then I come back and play with my sister. It is very hot, I want it to be cold. I want to be a teacher when I grow up. There is no water here.’

From Jadaliyya’s electronic roundtable on the Western Sahara. Photos by Andrew McConnell.

Notes

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